Mentoring girls end of year reflection

Blog post links to PTC1: establish and maintain effective professional relationships focused on the learning and well-being of ākonga

PTC5: show leadership that contributes to effective teaching and learning

Term 2: The focus was on Service- The girls brainstormed a list of things they wanted to do over the course of the term. Two of the girls volunteered at Church on Sunday by serving cups of tea and vacuuming the church foyer.  The girls also organised a whole school mufti day for the local animal shelter.

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Term 3: The focus was on Physical Activity- The girls brainstormed a list of things they could do to try new physical activities. The main was walking and we linked this through their interest to animals by talking a dog for a walk each fortnight, each time walking further. The girls want to go Roller Skating as well so we made it a weekend activity and invited parents/whanau to attend.

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Term 4: The focus was Adventure- The focus was for the girls to plan out a day, ensuring it met all the requirements of the brief. The activities link to each component the girls did each term.

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Year reflection:

Each fortnight I wrote a brief Narrative of the events, Observations of what I saw and next steps for the following fortnight. My main observation that the girls would not speak unless prompted so each would I would encourage conversation, student’s voice, ask their opinion, and slowly build their confidence.  The girls got really busy in term four with Social dancing and planning their own EOTC week that the planning for their adventure was rushed. This is something could be planned in term 3 in the future.

Improvements for next year:

-Before the year starts I will get the girls to fill out a student survey and this way I can get the girls to fill out the survey at the end and I can compare data.

-Involve another adult to help support the mentoring programme, teacher or parent.

-The girls to start a journal and each fortnight they can reflect on their goals.

-Build stronger links with the teachers and work alongside them in support the girls achieve their goals.

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Play.Sport

PTC4: demonstrate commitment to ongoing professional learning and development of personal professional practice

This year we have been working closely with Ryan from Play.Sport, he has worked with the senior syndicate in a number of ways; joining syndicate meetings, planning meetings, observations, support in creating integrated lessons for Inquiry and resources.

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Planning template for P.E Inquiry 

Teacher Practice Analysis

The purpose of a shared inquiry is to make a difference in valued outcomes for learners. The reflection question asks are we making enough of a difference? How do we know? Change does not always equal improvement or transformation. There are many instances where teachers have changed what they were doing only to find not much has changed for their learners

What have you noticed about the delivery of your practice that you think you need to change, and why?

Scanning-

25.6.17 Some students not engaged and participating while working in small groups.

1.6.17 Discussing Participating and Contributing, haven’t got anything for students to hang this on

 

What will you try to do differently and what support will you need with this?

Change-

25.6.17 Giving students the chance to have their say first, on a piece of paper and then share it with a buddy, so they have something to offer
1.6.17 Unpacking further what the different KC look like in P.E context. Could do this in writing, bus stop activity, collect together ideas and create a KC matrix to bring out and go over before the lesson.

 

What was the outcome of this change in practice and how do you know?

Reflection-

1.6.17 Students more engaged when TPS and discussing in groups. A few were not able to say back what their buddy had said. Keep building on this, the expectation is set, students know what TPS looks like. Expect this each time.

Next step: Ensuring the AO is a P.E, the WALT was more around participating and contributing then direct link to the AO. The KC are linked through the SC. Being more specific with AO from the curriculum. Unpacking further what the KC look like in PE context.

Feedback from Ryan from Play.Sport based on observation on 6.11.17: 
I liked the connection to your RE and reading- Ryan’s Well. Showed great use of successful integration. I was also impressed with the links you made to the class inquiry around ‘Inspiration’.
Good to see the lesson beginning with a WALT (Putting ourselves in someone else’s shoes) and revisiting prior knowledge that enable to kids to make connections with today’s learning. Straight away the class were engaged, particularly Angel, which was a first for me.
Your activity linked really well to the WALT which focused on discrimination and decision making.
However, you didn’t quite get to your planned activity which I loved. I really liked how you made most of that teachable moment and made the learning truely authentic. A real sign of a good teacher!
The class really got to understand what it feels like to be left out through the examples and discussions that were had. My only suggestion for improvement here would have been to experiment with the majority of the classes choice of letting captains pick teams. You could have let that happen but pulled the captains aside and asked them to each name their first pick and then tell them they weren’t allowed to chose those people, meaning they were left unwanted at the end. This may have illustrated to those who really thought that this was the best way of choosing, was actually not.
Great to see you allow time to reflect at the end of the session. Writing a word on a post it was a nice, quick way to gauge their feelings but it could have been a good idea to revisit the SC first, to draw them back to the intended learning and allow their response to reflect that. I only say this as I saw Semisi write, ‘dizzy’ as his word and didn’t see the connection.
All in all, a great ‘off the cuff’ lesson and I really enjoyed listening to the conversations and ideas the students had.
Keep up the great work!

Feedback from Ryan from Play.Sport based on observation on 1.6.17: 

  • Was good to start the lesson of with a purpose that kids were able to relate to other areas outside of PE. Real life, authentic!. Rules- why have them? Why do we need them?
  • I liked that only Semisi was the one to invent the rules and everyone had to abide by these. Good way to show fairness and equity. This should lead to some deeper thinking during Social Science
  • A good reflection questionnaire, however, most kids were stuck on the fact that they thought they should write new rules and not that they should all have a say in what the rules are. This might need to be reinforced.
  • Promoting the class through questioning allowed them to come to the realisation that voting is important when rulemaking.
  • Loved how this was as equally a SS lesson as a PE lesson.
  • It would be good to think up other activities or games to illustrate the same theme so class does not get stuck in thinking they are making just rules for basketball.
  • Was refreshing to see a teacher realise that the majority of the lesson doesn’t need to be spent playing the game, as its the discussion about what took place which is more beneficial.
  • WALT and SC were at start of lesson- just need to bring the class back to them at the end to gauge whether they understood what they should have been learning.
  • My only other suggestion would be around the size of the groups when playing the game. Is there an option for smaller groups and multiple games???

 

Maori Education Plan

Blog post links PTC 3: demonstrate commitment to bicultural partnership in Aotearoa New Zealand

PTC9: respond effectively to the diverse language and cultural experiences, and the varied strengths, interests, and needs of individuals and groups of ākonga

PTC10: work effectively within the bicultural context of Aotearoa New Zealand

NOTICING: What was happening here?

In 2016 a St Joseph’s Pasifika Education Plan was created with consultation of Kaitiaki (Maori and Pasifika parent group). A Maori Education plan is in the pipeline after getting our Pasifika Education Plan implemented at the end of 2016, beginning of 2017.

What did we notice?

There are many links from our Change and Movement plan- Culturally responsiveness that will sit alongside the Maori Education plan.

What are the issues?

We currently don’t have a Maori Education Plan and there are many things that we are already doing to support our Maori learners which can be added to our plan. We also have a number of actions we would like to see actioned.

 

INVESTIGATING: What do we already know about this?

We currently have a St Joseph’s School Pasifika Education plan as a model. We also have Maori Education plans from neighbouring schools to look at to see what other schools are currently doing to raise the achievement of their Maori learners.

What do we need to find out?

We have gained Whanau voice from our Whanau hui. We will also need to get staff input, so they can share their expertise.

How might we do this?

We had a Whanau Hui, Week 2/Term 2 where we invited Maori/Pasifika parents to the Upper Hutt Cossie Club. We shared what things we were doing since our last Whanau Hui in 2014 and then broke into focus groups to get ideas and feedback from the parents/whanau.

COLLABORATIVE SENSE-MAKING: What is our data telling us?

School Population:

European 41%, Asian 16%, Pasifika 18%, Maori 16% and Other 9%

Mid year data 2017:

At/ABOVE Reading Writing Maths
Maori 2016 76% (29/38) 63% (24/38) 71% (27/38)
Maori 2017 84% (29/38) +9% 70% (34/48) +7% 80% (39/49) +17%

The data is telling us that we have made great gains in Maths and gains in Reading/Writing from 2016-2017. There is work to do in raising the achievement of our Maori learners.

A few key points from the Whanau hui that parents would like us to continue doing:

  • Teachers to know their students really well both academically and emotionally
  • Priority learners: focusing on kids that can benefit from it
  • Homework club: Children working together and getting support
  • Reading Recovery
  • Seesaw: Feedback straight away and really motivating for students
  • Buddy classes
  • Curriculum nights

A few key points from the Whanau hui that parents would like us to consider doing:

  • Tuck shop to have healthier options
  • Online community; Making sure it is welcoming and parents encouraged to make contact
  • Thinking about how we start the year. Consistency across the school, bit more structure to the start
  • More opportunities for parents an opportunity to talk to each other
  • Hui every term with students
  • How we can communicate/build partnerships better, Reaching out to parent who can’t
  • Te reo in the classroom, more exposure and more consistent within the school
  • Veggie garden, Open it up to families/communities
  • How can we encourage pride in our culture
  • Involve families in language weeks, Share food/kai
  • Support parents with what they can do to help at home- in their language
  • Noho Marae – every year, beginning term 2: building relationships with whanau/iwi/hapu
  • Hangi

What insight does it provide?

There are already great things we are currently doing to support our Maori learners and involve our Maori Whanau based on feedback.

The feedback has created next steps and actions that can be implemented into our Maori Education Plan.

A few key tangible steps actions to add to our Maori Education Plan:

  • Parents would like support in what they can do at home to support their children. The school plan and organise curriculum evenings
  • Te Reo in the classroom: Teachers are developing a Te Reo Progressions

What might we need to explore further?

Teacher input, expertises, what can we do to raise the achievement of our Maori learners

PRIORITY TO TAKE ACTION: What do we need to do and why?

We will use the feedback from the Whanau Hui to draft and implement steps into our Maori Education Plan. We will look at Pasifika Education Plan as a scaffold and get ideas from Kaitiaki. We will seek further feedback from Kaitiaki, local Marae, staff once we have a draft.

How big is the change we are planning?

The Maori Education will take the remainder of Term 2/Term 3 to write the draft and seek consultation. The aim is to start implementing Term 1 2018.

What strengths do we have to draw on?

We have involved Kaitiaki to support with the writing of the Maori Education Plan. We have a policy writer in our Kaitiaki group who supported writing the Pasifika Education Plan and support from colleagues from neighboring schools.

What support might we need?

We will require consultation with Whanau, Board of Trustees and will seek support from our Ministry of Education Facilitator.

 

IMPROVEMENT IN ACTIONS: What is happening as a result of our improvement actions?

The Maori Education plan is drafted. We looked at the links between the Pasifika Education Plan and feedback from the whanau hut as a starting point. We used the feedback from the Whanau Hui to add actions to the plan, Kaitiaki shared their views, teachers had invited the school community to collect a copy of the Maori Education draft from the office.

Week 4: Share the draft Maori Education plan with Kaitiaki, Invitation given to all parents for feedback on the Maori Education Plan in a newsletter.

Week 5: Share draft Maori Education Plan with BOT

Week 6: Share with Judy Grose (Ministry of Education Facilitator)

Week 7: Share with Maori Education Plan with colleagues from Upper Hutt Cluster, Meet with Kaumatua of Orongomai

Week 8/9: Share with Staff, make changes, finalise the draft.

Teachers only day: Term 1, 2018. Time will be given to unpacking the Maori Education Plan and Pasifika Education Plan.

 

Do we need to adjust what we are doing?

Target Specific times throughout the year to bring the Maori and Pasifika Plan to the forefront at syndicate and as whole staff meetings (Twice a term as a syndicate and once a term as whole staff).

Termly updates in the newsletter informing school whanau with what we have achieved in that term and goals set for the following term.

Kaitiaki Staff representative to monitor the tracking of both Pasifika/Maori Education plan fortnightly and complete a self-review of both documents once a term.

Whanau Hui booking for Term 1, 2018, we are hoping in making this an annual event. We will feedback to what we have done since the last meeting and will have a chance to update and new goals, short/long for 2018.

St Joseph’s has employed a well-respected educator, proud of her Maori/Tikanga. She will be a wealth of knowledge and support in helping us bring our Maori Education plan to life in 2018.

St Joseph’s Maori Education Plan, St Joseph’s Te Reo Instructional, St Joseph’s Te Reo Integration available to read:

St Josephs Maori Education Plan – .docx (1)

_Te reo Maori Everyday Instructional

_Te reo Maori Everyday Integrationero

Pasifika Education Plan review

Post Links to PTC5– show leadership that contributes to effective teaching and learning

NOTICING: What was happening here?

In 2016 a St Joseph’s Pasifika Education Plan was created with consultation of Kaitiaki (Maori and Pasifika parent group). The Pasifika Education was to be implemented from Term 1 2017.

What did we notice?

The Pasifika Education plan is being implemented at various degrees around the school. The Pasifika Education plan is a valuable document that needs to be unpacked further with staff in order for it to be successful. Schools are busy places and when plans are created and not consistently brought to the forefront they can be under utilised.

What are the issues?

Many of the things we currently are doing in our classrooms, syndicate and within the school are from the Pasifika Education Plan or run parallel to this. The teaching staff have carried out Professional Development focusing on Cultural responsiveness this year and making changes to our practice.There are direct links to the Pasifika Education plan in many ways throughout the school. The aim moving forward is that the Pasifika Education Plan is implemented consistently across the school.

INVESTIGATING: What do we already know about this?

The St Joseph’s School Pasifika Education was written in 2016, the plan was unpacked at a staff meeting, at the board, and within Kaitiaki. The implementation of the plan was to occur in 2017, this has happened at various degrees within the school.

What do we need to find out?

  • Are the of actions in the Pasifika Education Plan realistic and achievable for teachers to be implementing in the classroom and across the school?
  • What support do teachers need in order for the plan to be implemented?
  • Does the school community know about some of the actions in the plan?

How might we do this?

  • Review of Pasifika Education plan with teachers and school community
  • Survey for school community and discussion at Kaitiaki
  • Unpacking what has been achieved with staff
  • Reflection on what has been achieved and what has not been achieved and why

 

COLLABORATIVE SENSE-MAKING What is our data telling us?

AT/ABOVE Reading Writing Maths
Pasifika 2016 69% (34/49) 65% (31/49) 63% (31/49)
Pasifika 2017 78% (38/49) +9% 70% (34/49) +5% 80% (39/49) +17%

screen-shot-2017-11-27-at-10-16-18-pm.pngFeedback from Whanau Hui and actions achieved, ongoing in green

Pasifika Education overarching focus goals:

  1. Pasifika learners excel in literacy and numeracy in primary school so they have access to choices at secondary school and tertiary education.
  2. Pasifika parents, families and communities engage with schools to champion and support their children’s learning.

What insight does it provide?

There has been positive shifts in our Pasifika learners in all curriculum areas. In the area of Reading an increase of 9%, Writing 5% and Maths 17%.

There are a number of actions from Term 2-4 that have been achieved from the Whanau hui as well as a number of other initiatives that have been implemented and not in the Pasifika Education Plan.  

The first goal; Pasifika learners excel in literacy and numeracy in primary school so they have access to choices at secondary school and tertiary education, is an ongoing goal and each year we can reflect and think about what teachers and the school can do better to help our Pasifika learners excel in all areas. The end of the 2017 year data shows a positive increase of Pasifika learners achieving at/above national standards in Reading, Writing, and Maths.

The second goal; Pasifika parents, families and communities engage with schools to champion and support their children’s learning. We have started to do this with the whanau hui, school mass and numeracy evening. This will be a major goal next year will be to continue to engage with parents and families. We will be looking at how we can build our school culture and be inclusiveness to all cultures.  

What might we need to explore further?

Gaining further ownership from teachers, students, community by using feedback (Term 1- Whanau Hui) and turning these into actions in the Pasifika Education Plan.

Exploring the PowerUP Plus programme.How can we get our school community engaged in this in 2018. What are the barriers to our families attending, can we offer support. Can we use this model and create something in Upper Hutt as part of the Upper Hutt cluster.

What do we need to do and why?

The Pasifika Education Plan is going to be unpacked during Teacher only day, Term 1/2018. There is going to be new staff in each area of the school that will need to be onboard. The PEP is also under review in which we will get feedback from our Whanau at the Whanau Hui-Term 1 2018.

There needs to be specific times throughout the year to bring the Maori and Pasifika Plan to the forefront at syndicate and whole staff meetings.This would be twice a term as a syndicate and once a term as a whole staff. The kaitiaki teacher representative will make time once a term with each syndicate to discuss the Maori/Pasifika Education Plan. A staff meeting once a term will be focused on the Maori/Pasifika Plan.  

The Kaitiaki Staff representative is to monitor the tracking of both Pasifika/Maori Education plan fortnightly and completes a self-review of both documents once a term.

Whanau Hui booking for Term 1, 2018 is going to an annual event. We will feedback regarding what we have done since the last meeting (T2/2017) and will have a chance to update and new goals, short/long for 2018.

How big is the change we are planning?

The change will require the Kaitiaki teacher representative to keep track and have greater accountability over ensure that Pasifika/Maori Education plans to ensure they embedded throughout the school. Their needs to be a greater responsibility of teachers that the Pasifika/Maori Education plans are to be embedded and breaking down ensuring teachers know what that looks like.

What strengths do we have to draw on?

We have a number of teaching staff who can support their knowledge, drawing on Kaitiaki with engaging with the community. Drawing on the strength of the learners and what we can do together in achieving our two overarching goals. Student voice and agency.

What support might we need?

We need the support of the BOT, we will need financial support to help with Professional development, Whanau Hui.

Term 3 reflection

Blog post links to PTC6- conceptualise, plan and implement an appropriate learning program

PTC7– promote a collaborative, inclusive and supportive learning environment

Term 3 had its number of curveballs and was a tricky one in terms of keeping things ticking over. At the end of term 2, Emma of the teachers in our area took leave for a year on an overseas adventure and Nadia, a first-year teacher took over her class. When you work so closely together with your colleagues in a collaborative space you really get to know each other as people as well as professionals. I had worked with Emma already previous in 2016 so I struggled with her absence to keep the traction moving forward in the team as there was a change in dynamic amongst the team. The term was challenging as everyone was trying to finding their feet. Reflection of Term 3

Positive

  • Priority learners for writing got a pre-writing lesson before the writing workshop. This worked really well and enabled the learners to get a chance to digest the content before the lesson
  • Upper Hutt Kapa Haka Festival
  • Food Festival
  • Whanau Numeracy evening
  • Year 6 showing leadership and year 5 confident in timetabling

Minus

  • Behaviour and interactions across the syndicate (big focus around PB4L next term and bringing this into everyday classroom)
  • The timetable is very tight, at times feels like trying to cover more and then some (some as Term 2). We did cut back this term and have really ensured we integrating our inquiry through Reading, Writing and R.E
  • The Arts, Science don’t seem to be getting coverage (some minus as Term 2)

Improvement 

  • Flipped learning through Writing and Maths. This is an amazing concept if you get it right. I would like to come back to this and ensure it is just part of what we do and is embedded in the daily routine.

What we are keeping

  • Timetabling
  • Integrating of Inquiry and working alongside Ryan at Play.Sport to support us with enriching our Physical Education and Health
  • Game of Awesome
  • Using Inquiry as linking through different curriculum areas

What are we changing 

  • We will be offering range of strategies from Addition/Subtraction, Multiplication and Division, Proportions and ratios strategy workshops, learners can make choices regarding which areas they need to address

What are we adding in 

  • Education Outside the classroom next term, so linking this through a Maths Inquiry at the beginning of the term
  • PB4L- having a syndicate focus, rewarding the positive, daily draw in each class each day

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Reminding that we are all on a learning journey and together we can achieve more if we went it alone.

Priority Learners Term 3

Blog post links PTC 1: Establish and maintain effective professional relationships focused on the learning and well-being of ākonga

PTC 4: demonstrate commitment to ongoing professional learning and development of personal professional practice

PTC8: demonstrate in practice their knowledge and understanding of how ākonga learn

PTC 11: analyse and appropriately use assessment information that has been gathered formally and informally

Here is what I have done in the area of Math’s support our priority learners in Term 3:

Maintenance/things we have continued from Term 2:

  • Individual Basic facts sheets to work on during goal setting for our Math Priority learners.
  • Weekly on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday having rostered time in the morning (20 minutes) to check in with priority learners.
  • Priority learners to attend all the Knowledge Warm up workshops each day
  • Workshops that cater for Priority learner needs each day
  • Multiple workshops for Mathematics Priority learners to attend
  • Celebrating success on Seesaw
  • Highlighting Priority learners in planning documents to ensure they are attending workshops, Priority Learners are noted at the top of our planning documents

New/improved things we have implemented from Term 3:

  • Tuakana/Teina – St PAT year 13 boys who are volunteering up during Maths once a week.
  • Knowledge workshop each day that target specific knowledge goals from Priority learner tracking sheet
  • Ensuring all our learners that are achieving below/well below are attending one maths workshop daily
  • Introducing Flipped learning. Creating and using a range of lessons for learners to watch prior to the lesson. This means lessons will be available to learners to watch to recap and to clarify when they wish.
  • Mini Workshops to target specific priority learner goals during timetabling time at the start of the day
  • Whanau evening to share things they can be doing to support at home( fun, take home back to games, tips).
  • Weekly discussions at Syndicate meeting about Priority learners, making note, sharing learner, ideas, where to next tips.

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St Pats Boys sharing a song with us.

Example of priority learner achieving his goals, picture from priority learner tracking sheet and example of problem-solving at a workshop.

 

Maintenance/things we have continued from Term 2:

  • Weekly on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday having rostered time in the morning (20 minutes) to check in with priority learners.
  • Celebrating success on Seesaw
  • Including Free writing into the Must Do each day.
  • Giving the students a choice to use their own device or school device when writing, to support with other areas of learning
  • Making links from Inquiry, Reading, Maths, and Writing
  • Writing: range of different ways to support goals; e.g punctuation poster, editing pencil.
  • Teaching specific skills during goal setting time.

New/improved things we have implemented from Term 3 onwards:

  • Individual teacher inquiry in how to engage boys into writing.  
  • Research and seek out resources of how to engage boys (TKI)
  • Survey the boys and ask them what they want to write about.
  • Priority learners to have a prewriting lesson before the writing workshop. This will mean that they will get the lesson before everyone does so when they attend the writing workshop lesson they know what they are doing.
  • Introducing Flipped learning. Creating and using a range of lessons for learners to watch prior to the lesson. This means lessons will be available to learners to watch to recap and to clarify when they wish.
  • Change our writing program to move away from genre-based and more on interest and passion to engage our refluent boys.
  • Tapping into teacher knowledge within our school (a teacher has been through ALL) have discussions with them.
  • Target boys with Game of Awesome, focusing on drawing on their ideas and using this as a way of encouraging them to write.
  • Syndicate journal of writing, creating a purpose for the writing. Selling the journal at school event.
  • Greater links between Reading, Writing and Inquiry through the integrated unit.

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Game of Awesome plate being used, Peer feedback using a Writing progressions, an Inquiry-based piece which shows a description of a static image.

Maintenance/things we have continued from Term 3 that link across all curriculum areas

  • Weekly on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday having rostered time in the morning (20 minutes) to check in with priority learners.
  • Celebrating success on Seesaw
  • Including Free writing into the Must Do each day.
  • Giving the students a choice to use their own device or school device when writing, to support with other areas of learning
  • Making links from Inquiry, Reading, Maths, and Writing
  • Writing: range of different ways to support goals; e.g punctuation poster, editing pencil.
  • Teaching specific skills during goal setting time.
  • He Toa Taiohi-Young Warriors Programme

Two of the priority learner girls from my class have been involved in He Toa Taiohi

 

Community involement

Blog post links to PTC9: respond effectively to the diverse language and cultural experiences, and the varied strengths, interests, and needs of individuals and groups of ākonga

Term 3/4 has been busy with day to day teaching but it also has been a busy time with all the extra- activities happening with our school community. Engaging with the community and organising events so this can happen is something I am passionate about.

  • Whanau Numeracy Evening: A way to play games with parents and teach them how we solve maths problems.
  • Tongan Language Week: Weekly events that ending in Tongan students organising and selling Tongan food at lunchtime
  • Maori Language week- Weekly events organised by students and a range of food organised by students
  • International Food Festival- a fundraising raising event encourage the school community to mix and mingle on the night, try new food and raise money for the hall kitchen
  • Tea Towel fundraising is a fundraising idea I help carry out through FOSS
  • Boys and Blokes night was a successful event, a survey went home during Term 4 and the winner was Laser force. A bus took 50 blokes to laser force in town.

 

 

Prioritising to take action

Blog links to PTC8: demonstrate in practice their knowledge and understanding of how ākonga learn

PTC11 :analyse and appropriately use assessment information that has been gathered formally and informally

This blog post links to the data on data.analyse.action blog post

So what insight does the data provide:

The data reflects that is a decrease in achievement with our year 5 learners as they moved from curriculum level 2, to curriculum level 3. Teachers teaching the year 4 need to be working more closely with the year 5 teachers so the expectations are clear.  Teachers need to be looking at mid year and end of year OTJ across syndicates.

Maths: The data is showing that there are 16 boys and 5 girls achieving at well below/below national standards for Maths.

Writing: The data is showing that we need to change our writing program to cater for our boys.The boys are the target with 35% (14/40) of our boys achieving well below/below National Standards for writing. We need to take action now to ensure we are addressing the needs.

What we plan to carry in Maths and why:

  • Tuakana/Teina – buddying our Priority learners up with role model, someone they look up to in the seniors to check in with, work alongside and teach each other.
  • Knowledge workshop each day that target specific knowledge goals from Priority learner tracking sheet. In order for students to accelerate their knowledge must be there so they can draw on this when using strategies.
  • Ensuring all our learners that are achieving below/well below are attending one maths workshop daily. The more workshops students are attending means more learning opportunities.
  • Introducing Flipped learning into our programs. Creating and using a range of video lessons which will be available to watch online for our learners to watch prior to the lesson. This means lessons will be available to learners to watch to recap and to clarify when they wish. This also means that will have some prior knowledge of the content before it is taught.
  • Mini Workshops to target specific priority learner goals during timetabling time at the start of the day. This is to ensure that priority learners have opportunities to learn, master and achieve their goals.
  • Mathematics evening so learners can share and teach their Whanau games and strategies they can be doing at home ( fun, take home back of games, tips).

What we plan to carry in Writing and why:

  • Individual teacher inquiry in how to engage boys into writing. This will mean teachers can research and seek out resources of how to engage boys (TKI).
  • Survey the boys and ask them what they want to write about. This will give the teachers some baseline data to work off. Change our writing program to move away from genre based and more on interest and passion to engage our reluctant boys.
  • Buddy Writing (Tuakana/Teina), enabling students to work alongside someone to collaborate a piece of writing and draw one each other’s strengths.
  • Priority learners to have a prewriting lesson before their writing lesson. This will mean that they will get the lesson before everyone does so when they attend the lesson they know what they are doing.
  • Introducing Flipped learning into our programs. Creating and using a range of video lessons which will be available to watch online for our learners to watch prior to the lesson. This means lessons will be available to learners to watch to recap and to clarify when they wish. This also means that will have some prior knowledge of the content before it is taught.
  • Make time to see other schools that are implementing ALL within their schools. This will give up ideas of what we can try in our writing program.

How big is the change we are planning?

The changes we are planning to make are adjustments to our current programs. The teacher inquiry will mean that three teachers are working together from different angles to find ways of engaging our boys and helping them to be successful writers.

What strengths do we have to draw on?

  • Teachers are using the mid year data to make changes to their own practice and through teacher, inquiry changes as a syndicate to how we approach writing
  • Engaging with parents/whanau, continue to build on the relationship between home and school
  • Draw on skills we have within staff to give us guidance with our Writing program
  • Teachers are continuously updating their blogs, attending the Upper Hutt cluster and PD readings

 

What support might we need?

  • Time and openness to work together across the school with other teachers  looking at OTJ moderations
  • PD on OTJ moderation across the school
  • Teacher aid support time during our writing program to support our priority learners and other struggling learners

Shifts in our practice 2017:

  • More in depth priority learner tracking sheets
  • Genius hour to bring the learners passions to life
  • Priority Learners discussed at the start of each syndicate meeting and having their names at the top of the teachers planning documents to track and ensure Priority learners are attending workshops
  • Streamed Independent activities
  • Integration of Physical Education through inquiry and making the lessons meaningful and purposeful
  • Ensuring our learning walls have exemplars and examples on the wall to reflect what success looks like

Flipped learning

Week 4 Sign up document

Data.Analyse.Action

Blog post links PTC11- analyse and appropriately use assessment information, which has been gathered formally and informally

PTC12– use critical inquiry and problem-solving effectively in their professional practice

PTC6-conceptualise, plan and implement an appropriate learning programme

Reading

Reading

The big picture data reflects an increased level of learners that are working below/below the aspirational national standards for year 5. The data has increased from 3% (1/38) at the end of 2016, to 9% (3/35%) at mid year 2017. Further analysis of this cohort highlighted that 5% (1/19) is made up of boys and 10% (2/16) is made up of girls that are achieving well below/below the aspirational national standards.

The big picture data reflects a decreased level of learners that are working below/below the aspirational national standards for year 6. The data has decreased from 25% (15/60) at the end of 2016, to 19% (11/58) at mid year 2017. Further analysis of this cohort highlighted that 24% (11/38) is made up of boys and 10% (2/20) is made up of girls that are achieving well below/below the aspirational national standards. Further analyse reflects that 57% (8/14) of the learners achieving well below/below are English as second language learners. 

The data is showing us that we need to engaged the boys in Reading as they make up 74% (12/16) of the learners in year 5/6 that are achieving well below/below standard for Reading.

The actions we are implementing from week 4(Term 3):

-Research and seek out resources of how to engage boys (TKI)

-Links between engaging Boys in Writing and transfer these into Reading

-Rainbow Reading with Teacher Aide

-ESOL support for these learners during Reading times

Writing

Writing

Our Priority learner data reflects that 20%( 2/9- Pasifika female, European male) of our learners are achieving at national standard and 80% 7/9 are achieving below national standard based on our mid year 2017 data collection.

The big picture data reflects that there is an increased level of learners that are now working at well below/below the aspirational national standard for year 5. The data has increased from 17% (6/34) at the end of 2016, to 34% (12/35) at mid year 2017. Further analysis of this cohort highlighted that 33% (6/18) of the boys achieving at well below/below has increased to 42% (8/19) at mid year 2017 and girls increasing from 6% (1/16) at the end of 2016 to 25% (4/16).

The big picture data reflects a decreased level of learners that are working below/below the aspirational national standards for year 6. The data has decreased from 40.7% (20/59) at the end of 2016, to 37% (22/58) at mid year 2017. Further analysis of this cohort highlighted that 35% (14/40) of the boys achieving at well below/below the end of 2016  has increased to 50%  (19/38) at mid year 2017 and girls increasing from 6% (1/16) at the end of 2016 to 25% (4/16). The girl’s data has decreased from 31% (6/19) at the end of 2016 to 15% (3/20), mid year 2017.

The data is showing us that we need to change our writing program to charter for our boys. The boys are the target with 36%  34/93 of our boys achieving well below/below national standards for writing. We need to take action now to ensure we are addressing the need.

The actions we are implementing from week 4(Term 3):

-Individual teacher inquiry in how to engage boys in writing.

-Research and seek out resources of how to engage boys (TKI)

-Survey the boys and ask them what they want to write about.

-Buddy Writing ( Tuakana/Teina)

-Priority learners to have a prewriting lesson before their writing lesson. This will mean that they will get the lesson before everyone does so when they attend the lesson they know what they are doing.

-Introducing Flipped learning. Creating and using a range of lessons for learners to watch prior to the lesson. This means lessons will be available to learners to watch to recap and to clarify when they wish.

-Implement Game of Awesome into our Writing program

Game of Awesome teacher support material (2)

 

Maths

Maths

Our Priority learner data reflects that 20% 2/9 (Maori- Male, European male) of our learners are achieving at national standard and 80% 7/9 are achieving below national standard based on our mid year 2017 data collection.

The big picture data reflects that there is an increased level of learners that are now working at below or well below the aspirational national standard for year 5. The data has increased from 8% (3/34) at the end of 2016, to 20%  (7/35) at the mid year 2017. Further analysis of this cohort highlighted that 5% (1/18) of the boys achieving at below or well below has increased to 26% (5/19) at the mid year 2017 and girls increasing from 0% at the end of 2016 to 12% (2/16).

The big picture data reflects a decreased level of learners that are working below or well below the aspirational national standards for year 6. The number of well below/below learners has decreased from 33.9% (20/59) at the end of 2016, to 24.1% (14/58) at mid year 2017. Further analysis of this cohort highlighted that 31% (14/40) of the boys achieving at well below/below at the end of 2016  has decreased to 28% (11/38) and the girls achieving at well below/below has decreased from 31% (6/19) at the end of 2016 to 15% (3/20), mid year 2017.

The actions we are implementing from week 4(Term 3):

-Tuakana/Teina – buddying our Priority learners, boys up with St PAT year 13 boys who are volunteering up during Maths once a week.

-Knowledge workshop each day that target specific knowledge goals from Priority learner tracking sheet

-Ensuring all our learners that are achieving below/well below are attending one maths workshop daily

-Introducing Flipped learning. Creating and using a range of lessons for learners to watch prior to the lesson. This means lessons will be available to learners to watch to recap and to clarify when they wish.

-Mini workshops to target specific priority learner goals during timetabling time at the start of the day

-Priority learner whanau evening to share things they can be doing to support at home( fun, take home pack of games, tips)

 

 

 

 

 

Cultural Responsiveness

Blog post links PTC 3: demonstrate commitment to bicultural partnership in Aotearoa New Zealand

PTC 4: demonstrate commitment to ongoing professional learning and development of personal professional practice

PTC5: show leadership that contributes to effective teaching and learning

PTC 9: respond effectively to the diverse language and cultural experiences, and the varied strengths, interests, and needs of individuals and groups of ākonga

PTC 10: work effectively within the bicultural context of Aotearoa New Zealand

PTC 12: use critical inquiry and problem solving effectively in their professional practice

This year I have been driving Cultural responsiveness, what this looks like within our school and what Culturally responsiveness teaching looks like. I have organised three staff meetings on building Cultural Responsiveness, with another one organised for week 6/Term 3.

The First staff meeting: (Week 1/Term 2) 

-Each staff member brought something that represented their culture and everyone had a chance to share what they brought and the significance it has representing their culture.

-Prior to the staff meeting in the holiday, everyone read Colouring in the White Spaces and fill out the reflection sheet. In groups, we discussed the reflection sheet.

-Where to now: Each staff member wrote one next step for the following week.

Week 1

Cultural

The Second staff meeting: (Week 2/Term 2) 

-Each staff meeting got a pack in the holiday break with Colouring the White Spaces, Ka Hikitia and Tataiako. We did a treasure hunt in groups: Tataiako Treasure Hunt.

-Jigsaw Activity: Bishop/Ka Hikitia/Tataiako. Each section was mixed up and in groups and through discussion the groups had to put together the three different sections.

Week 23 Act

download ka-hikitia-summary-te-reo-300h Tataiako-Cultural-competencies-for-teachers-of-Maori-learners_imagelargeTaiWeek 7

The third staff meeting: (Week 7/Term 2) 

-In groups sharing what we had changed in our practice this term, what things had work, what we could change.

-Te Reo Progressions: In syndicate groups working through what Te Reo looks like in their area