Prioritising to take action

Blog links to PTC8: demonstrate in practice their knowledge and understanding of how ākonga learn

PTC11 :analyse and appropriately use assessment information that has been gathered formally and informally

This blog post links to the data on data.analyse.action blog post

So what insight does the data provide:

The data reflects that is a decrease in achievement with our year 5 learners as they moved from curriculum level 2, to curriculum level 3. Teachers teaching the year 4 need to be working more closely with the year 5 teachers so the expectations are clear.  Teachers need to be looking at mid year and end of year OTJ across syndicates.

Maths: The data is showing that there are 16 boys and 5 girls achieving at well below/below national standards for Maths.

Writing: The data is showing that we need to change our writing program to cater for our boys.The boys are the target with 35% (14/40) of our boys achieving well below/below National Standards for writing. We need to take action now to ensure we are addressing the needs.

What we plan to carry in Maths and why:

  • Tuakana/Teina – buddying our Priority learners up with role model, someone they look up to in the seniors to check in with, work alongside and teach each other.
  • Knowledge workshop each day that target specific knowledge goals from Priority learner tracking sheet. In order for students to accelerate their knowledge must be there so they can draw on this when using strategies.
  • Ensuring all our learners that are achieving below/well below are attending one maths workshop daily. The more workshops students are attending means more learning opportunities.
  • Introducing Flipped learning into our programs. Creating and using a range of video lessons which will be available to watch online for our learners to watch prior to the lesson. This means lessons will be available to learners to watch to recap and to clarify when they wish. This also means that will have some prior knowledge of the content before it is taught.
  • Mini Workshops to target specific priority learner goals during timetabling time at the start of the day. This is to ensure that priority learners have opportunities to learn, master and achieve their goals.
  • Mathematics evening so learners can share and teach their Whanau games and strategies they can be doing at home ( fun, take home back of games, tips).

What we plan to carry in Writing and why:

  • Individual teacher inquiry in how to engage boys into writing. This will mean teachers can research and seek out resources of how to engage boys (TKI).
  • Survey the boys and ask them what they want to write about. This will give the teachers some baseline data to work off. Change our writing program to move away from genre based and more on interest and passion to engage our reluctant boys.
  • Buddy Writing (Tuakana/Teina), enabling students to work alongside someone to collaborate a piece of writing and draw one each other’s strengths.
  • Priority learners to have a prewriting lesson before their writing lesson. This will mean that they will get the lesson before everyone does so when they attend the lesson they know what they are doing.
  • Introducing Flipped learning into our programs. Creating and using a range of video lessons which will be available to watch online for our learners to watch prior to the lesson. This means lessons will be available to learners to watch to recap and to clarify when they wish. This also means that will have some prior knowledge of the content before it is taught.
  • Make time to see other schools that are implementing ALL within their schools. This will give up ideas of what we can try in our writing program.

How big is the change we are planning?

The changes we are planning to make are adjustments to our current programs. The teacher inquiry will mean that three teachers are working together from different angles to find ways of engaging our boys and helping them to be successful writers.

What strengths do we have to draw on?

  • Teachers are using the mid year data to make changes to their own practice and through teacher, inquiry changes as a syndicate to how we approach writing
  • Engaging with parents/whanau, continue to build on the relationship between home and school
  • Draw on skills we have within staff to give us guidance with our Writing program
  • Teachers are continuously updating their blogs, attending the Upper Hutt cluster and PD readings

 

What support might we need?

  • Time and openness to work together across the school with other teachers  looking at OTJ moderations
  • PD on OTJ moderation across the school
  • Teacher aid support time during our writing program to support our priority learners and other struggling learners

Shifts in our practice 2017:

  • More in depth priority learner tracking sheets
  • Genius hour to bring the learners passions to life
  • Priority Learners discussed at the start of each syndicate meeting and having their names at the top of the teachers planning documents to track and ensure Priority learners are attending workshops
  • Streamed Independent activities
  • Integration of Physical Education through inquiry and making the lessons meaningful and purposeful
  • Ensuring our learning walls have exemplars and examples on the wall to reflect what success looks like

Flipped learning

Week 4 Sign up document

Data.Analyse.Action

Blog post links PTC11- analyse and appropriately use assessment information, which has been gathered formally and informally

PTC12– use critical inquiry and problem-solving effectively in their professional practice

PTC6-conceptualise, plan and implement an appropriate learning programme

Reading

Reading

The big picture data reflects an increased level of learners that are working below/below the aspirational national standards for year 5. The data has increased from 3% (1/38) at the end of 2016, to 9% (3/35%) at mid year 2017. Further analysis of this cohort highlighted that 5% (1/19) is made up of boys and 10% (2/16) is made up of girls that are achieving well below/below the aspirational national standards.

The big picture data reflects a decreased level of learners that are working below/below the aspirational national standards for year 6. The data has decreased from 25% (15/60) at the end of 2016, to 19% (11/58) at mid year 2017. Further analysis of this cohort highlighted that 24% (11/38) is made up of boys and 10% (2/20) is made up of girls that are achieving well below/below the aspirational national standards. Further analyse reflects that 57% (8/14) of the learners achieving well below/below are English as second language learners. 

The data is showing us that we need to engaged the boys in Reading as they make up 74% (12/16) of the learners in year 5/6 that are achieving well below/below standard for Reading.

The actions we are implementing from week 4(Term 3):

-Research and seek out resources of how to engage boys (TKI)

-Links between engaging Boys in Writing and transfer these into Reading

-Rainbow Reading with Teacher Aide

-ESOL support for these learners during Reading times

Writing

Writing

Our Priority learner data reflects that 20%( 2/9- Pasifika female, European male) of our learners are achieving at national standard and 80% 7/9 are achieving below national standard based on our mid year 2017 data collection.

The big picture data reflects that there is an increased level of learners that are now working at well below/below the aspirational national standard for year 5. The data has increased from 17% (6/34) at the end of 2016, to 34% (12/35) at mid year 2017. Further analysis of this cohort highlighted that 33% (6/18) of the boys achieving at well below/below has increased to 42% (8/19) at mid year 2017 and girls increasing from 6% (1/16) at the end of 2016 to 25% (4/16).

The big picture data reflects a decreased level of learners that are working below/below the aspirational national standards for year 6. The data has decreased from 40.7% (20/59) at the end of 2016, to 37% (22/58) at mid year 2017. Further analysis of this cohort highlighted that 35% (14/40) of the boys achieving at well below/below the end of 2016  has increased to 50%  (19/38) at mid year 2017 and girls increasing from 6% (1/16) at the end of 2016 to 25% (4/16). The girl’s data has decreased from 31% (6/19) at the end of 2016 to 15% (3/20), mid year 2017.

The data is showing us that we need to change our writing program to charter for our boys. The boys are the target with 36%  34/93 of our boys achieving well below/below national standards for writing. We need to take action now to ensure we are addressing the need.

The actions we are implementing from week 4(Term 3):

-Individual teacher inquiry in how to engage boys in writing.

-Research and seek out resources of how to engage boys (TKI)

-Survey the boys and ask them what they want to write about.

-Buddy Writing ( Tuakana/Teina)

-Priority learners to have a prewriting lesson before their writing lesson. This will mean that they will get the lesson before everyone does so when they attend the lesson they know what they are doing.

-Introducing Flipped learning. Creating and using a range of lessons for learners to watch prior to the lesson. This means lessons will be available to learners to watch to recap and to clarify when they wish.

-Implement Game of Awesome into our Writing program

Game of Awesome teacher support material (2)

 

Maths

Maths

Our Priority learner data reflects that 20% 2/9 (Maori- Male, European male) of our learners are achieving at national standard and 80% 7/9 are achieving below national standard based on our mid year 2017 data collection.

The big picture data reflects that there is an increased level of learners that are now working at below or well below the aspirational national standard for year 5. The data has increased from 8% (3/34) at the end of 2016, to 20%  (7/35) at the mid year 2017. Further analysis of this cohort highlighted that 5% (1/18) of the boys achieving at below or well below has increased to 26% (5/19) at the mid year 2017 and girls increasing from 0% at the end of 2016 to 12% (2/16).

The big picture data reflects a decreased level of learners that are working below or well below the aspirational national standards for year 6. The number of well below/below learners has decreased from 33.9% (20/59) at the end of 2016, to 24.1% (14/58) at mid year 2017. Further analysis of this cohort highlighted that 31% (14/40) of the boys achieving at well below/below at the end of 2016  has decreased to 28% (11/38) and the girls achieving at well below/below has decreased from 31% (6/19) at the end of 2016 to 15% (3/20), mid year 2017.

The actions we are implementing from week 4(Term 3):

-Tuakana/Teina – buddying our Priority learners, boys up with St PAT year 13 boys who are volunteering up during Maths once a week.

-Knowledge workshop each day that target specific knowledge goals from Priority learner tracking sheet

-Ensuring all our learners that are achieving below/well below are attending one maths workshop daily

-Introducing Flipped learning. Creating and using a range of lessons for learners to watch prior to the lesson. This means lessons will be available to learners to watch to recap and to clarify when they wish.

-Mini workshops to target specific priority learner goals during timetabling time at the start of the day

-Priority learner whanau evening to share things they can be doing to support at home( fun, take home pack of games, tips)

 

 

 

 

 

Cultural Responsiveness

Blog post links PTC 3: demonstrate commitment to bicultural partnership in Aotearoa New Zealand

PTC 4: demonstrate commitment to ongoing professional learning and development of personal professional practice

PTC5: show leadership that contributes to effective teaching and learning

PTC 9: respond effectively to the diverse language and cultural experiences, and the varied strengths, interests, and needs of individuals and groups of ākonga

PTC 10: work effectively within the bicultural context of Aotearoa New Zealand

PTC 12: use critical inquiry and problem solving effectively in their professional practice

This year I have been driving Cultural responsiveness, what this looks like within our school and what Culturally responsiveness teaching looks like. I have organised three staff meetings on building Cultural Responsiveness, with another one organised for week 6/Term 3.

The First staff meeting: (Week 1/Term 2) 

-Each staff member brought something that represented their culture and everyone had a chance to share what they brought and the significance it has representing their culture.

-Prior to the staff meeting in the holiday, everyone read Colouring in the White Spaces and fill out the reflection sheet. In groups, we discussed the reflection sheet.

-Where to now: Each staff member wrote one next step for the following week.

Week 1

Cultural

The Second staff meeting: (Week 2/Term 2) 

-Each staff meeting got a pack in the holiday break with Colouring the White Spaces, Ka Hikitia and Tataiako. We did a treasure hunt in groups: Tataiako Treasure Hunt.

-Jigsaw Activity: Bishop/Ka Hikitia/Tataiako. Each section was mixed up and in groups and through discussion the groups had to put together the three different sections.

Week 23 Act

download ka-hikitia-summary-te-reo-300h Tataiako-Cultural-competencies-for-teachers-of-Maori-learners_imagelargeTaiWeek 7

The third staff meeting: (Week 7/Term 2) 

-In groups sharing what we had changed in our practice this term, what things had work, what we could change.

-Te Reo Progressions: In syndicate groups working through what Te Reo looks like in their area

 

 

Priority Learners T2

 

Blog post links PTC 1: Establish and maintain effective professional relationships focused on the learning and well-being of ākonga

PTC 4: demonstrate commitment to ongoing professional learning and development of personal professional practice

PTC8: demonstrate in practice their knowledge and understanding of how ākonga learn

PTC 11: analyse and appropriately use assessment information that has been gathered formally and informally

Here is what I have done in the area of Math’s support our priority learners in Term 2: 

Maintenance/things we have continued from Term 1:

  • Individual Basic facts sheets to work on during goal setting for our Math Priority learners.
  • Weekly on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday having rostered time in the morning (20 minutes) to check in with priority learners.
  • Encouraging Priority learners to attend homework club
  • Priority learners to attend all the Knowledge Warm up workshops each day
  • Workshops that cater for Priority learner needs each day
  • Multiple workshops for Mathematics Priority learners to attend
  • Celebrating success on Seesaw

New/improved things we have implemented in Term 2:

  • Integrated Unit to linked through strand- statistical investigation on rubbish collection in the school, data collection lead to student making changes within the school
  • Priority learners went to the same teacher during Maths workshops for the term, alongside other learners with similar learning goals. This enabled the teacher to push the priority learners and there was more consistency from lesson to lesson. It also meant the teacher was able to track progress and see if follow up tasks were being meet.  
  • Mathletics point requirement with specific tasks daily/weekly expectation
  • Examples of strategies added to the learning wall

BF 1

Example of Basic Facts sheet of Priority Learner, achieving all in Stage 6

Mult :Div

Here is what I have done in the area of Writing’s support our priority learners in Term 2: 

Maintenance/things we have continued from Term 1:

  • Weekly on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday having rostered time in the morning (20 minutes) to check in with priority learners.
  • Encouraging Priority learners to attend homework club
  • Celebrating success on Seesaw
  • Including Free writing into the Must Do each day.
  • Giving the students a choice to use their own device or school device when writing, to support with other areas of learning
  • Teacher use of Literacy Shed to engage and spark interest
  • Making links from Inquiry, Reading, Maths, and Writing
  • Writing: range of different ways to support goals; e.g punctuation poster, editing pencil.
  • Teaching specific skills during goal setting time.

PUN

Punctuation Ladder uses to self-assess, linking to PL learning goal

Joe

Celebrations on Seesaw

 

New/improved things we have implemented in Term 2:

  • Writing workshops up and running with the purpose of writing linking to Inquiry.
  • The use of 30 Chromebooks in the Seniors has opened up further opportunity for Priority learners to use devices to write on, share documents with their peers and teachers.
  • Free writing is adding into Daily must do activities
  • Sheena Cameron editing pencil, punctuation ladder used to support priority learners
  • Range of resources created, made to support goals; handwriting book, punctuation card, Fanboy activity
  • Use of exemplars and students examples for Priority learners to use as examples
  • Opportunities to share writing in front of class and syndicate
  • Range of exemplars, examples of different writing genre added to the writing wall

New/improved things we have implemented in Term 2 that link across both Maths/Writing PL focus:

  • Streamlined Must do/Can do, range of activities that must be completed through the day/week, these can be done in any order, any time of day, giving students more ownership over their timetable and management of their time
  • Students lead their parents/whanau through the different classrooms explaining their learning, next steps and shared their achievements
  • Genius hour- passion project that students work on once a week. This is based on high interest and lead by the students
  • Highlighting Priority learners in planning documents to ensure they are attending workshops, Priority Learners are noted at the top of our planning documents
  • Weekly discussions at Syndicate meeting about Priority learners, making note, sharing learner, ideas, where to next tips.

Independant

Can Do and Must Do’s independent activity sheet, Changes to PL Can Do and Must Do’s

Student lead 3-way conference Scripts: Learners had the chance to use the script or speak on their own.

Genius Hour Showcase

Genius Hour Show Case to celebrate the Genius hour projects from Term 2

ERO

Prioritising to take Action

See Data.Analyse.Action blog post

 

 

 

 

Tuakana/Teina

Blog post links PTC 2: Demonstrate commitment to promoting the well-being of all ākonga

 PTC 3: demonstrate commitment to bicultural partnership in Aotearoa New Zealand

PTC 9: respond effectively to the diverse language and cultural experiences, and the varied strengths, interests, and needs of individuals and groups of ākonga

PTC 10: work effectively within the bicultural context of Aotearoa New Zealand

The Senior and Junior Synidate started a Tuakana/Teina program at the end of Term 1. The purpose was to build a tuakanateina relationship, an integral part of traditional Māori society, which provides a model for buddy systems. An older or more expert Tuakana (brother, sister or cousin) helps and guides a younger or less expert Teina (originally a younger sibling or cousin of the same gender). In a learning environment that recognises the value of ako, the tuakana–teina roles may be reversed at any time.

We buddied each senior student with a junior student and took turns at organising an activity to do alongside our buddy. In Term 2 we created more of a structure to the program with a theme and learning outcomes of each lesson.

At the end of the Term 2, we celebrated Matariki by going to Te Papa with our buddies (200 students in total). The experienced enabled the Seniors syndicate learners to step into a leadership role and ensure they cared and looked after their buddy while at Te Papa. The trip was a success with many positive comments from our learners and parent helpers.

 

Te Papa.png

Term 2- Theme: Te Reo Maori:                                                       

Week Theme Organisation Resources needed:
Week 1 Counting to 10 in Maori

WALT count to 10 in Te Reo Maori

Senior teachers -Counting picture printed

-Paper for poster

-Pencils/felts for poster

Looking at number poster, saying the word and budding repeating it back, make their own poster showing number, word in English, in Maori and symbol/object to show that number.
Week 2 Counting to 10 in Maori

WALT count to 10 in Te Reo Maori

With the option of going up to 20.

Junior teachers
  • Card (x20) per group.
  • Poster (picture)
  • Pencils/felts to make cards.
Continuing on from last week groups to go back over 1-10 in Te Reo with the option of going up to 20 if buddy seems capable.

Using the cards groups can make flash cards up to 20 or make up a game (maybe snap) if only going to 10. Practice the game together.  

Week 3 Days of the week in Maori

WALT say the day of the weeks in Te Reo Maori

Senior teachers -Days of the week picture printed
Looking at days of the week, saying the word and budding repeating it back,makeupp actions for each word: Monday, Rahina, Making a sign with arms showing m.
Week 4 Months of the year in Maori

WALT say the months of the year in Te Reo Maori.

Junior teachers
  • Months of the year poster for each group.
  • Video of the song – Aroha singing
  • Ukulele and other musical instruments.
Buddies to stay in the class (in juniors) and watch the video of song. Junior kids to teach the seniors the song of months of the year, seniors to read posters with them. Using instruments, practice the song, make up a new one if they want to.
Week 5
*Didn’t do this week, short week and singing practice
Positive praise

WALT give compliments in Te Reo Maori

Senior Teachers -Positive praise sheet

-blank sticker

-colour pencils/felts

Looking at Positive praise with their buddy, saying the sayings and repeating back, picking one each, writing the word and then decorating the word. Aim to say the word and give the sticker to someone who deserves it throughout the day.
Week 6 Matariki

WALT recall the legend of Matariki

Senior Teachers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l9wNlCgzzkE
https://www.tepapa.govt.nz/learn/for-educators/teaching-resources/maori-customs/matariki-waiata-song
Meet in the seniors, seniors to take juniors back to class, will have a Matariki video to watch.

Song to sing. Talking about Matariki, then with their buddy creating a poster, showing the 7 stars, labeling them.

Week 7 Positive praise

WALT give compliments in Te Reo Maori

Senior Teachers -Positive praise sheet

-blank sticker

-colour pencils/felts

Looking at Positive praise with buddy, saying the sayings and repeating back, picking one each, writing the word and then decorating the word. Aim to say the word and give the sticker to someone who deserves it throughout the day.
Week 8 Describing words in Maori

WALT describe how we feel using Te Reo Maori

Senior teachers -Describing words picture printed
Looking at Describing words, saying the word and budding repeating it back, make up actions for each word: Hungry, Matekai- rubbing tummy. (see picture below)
Week 10 Poi: E Rere Taku Poi

WALT swing the poi when singing

Senior teachers Poi
Using the poi, in buddies (x4, buddy groups buddy up) showing their buddy the actions

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PEcjtEJ3Si0

 

 

 

 

Whanau hui

Blog post links to PTC3– demonstrate a commitment to bicultural partnership in Aotearoa New Zealand. Tātaiako Key competency link: Tangata Whenuatanga

PT7– promote a collaborative, inclusive and supportive learning environment. Tātaiako Key competency: Manaakitanga

 

PTC9– respond effectively to the diverse language and cultural experiences, and the varied strengths, interests, and needs of individuals and groups of ākonga. Tātaiako key competency link: Tangata Whenuatanga

Kaitiaki and the Board of Trustees teamed up to host a Whanau Hui a the Cossie Club on Tuesday 9th May to get Whanau feedback on what things they liked us doing in the school, things we wanted to change and things they wanted us to consider doing. We had a positive turn out on the evening of both staff and whanau. The data was collected and short term and long term goals were formed and added to our annual plan.

Whanau Hui

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Feedback

Pedagogy team

Blog post links PTC 4: demonstrate commitment to ongoing professional learning and development of personal professional practice

PTC5: show leadership that contributes to effective teaching and learning

PTC 9: respond effectively to the diverse language and cultural experiences, and the varied strengths, interests, and needs of individuals and groups of ākonga

PTC 12: use critical inquiry and problem solving effectively in their professional practice

In Term 1 an invitation was put out to all the staff inviting those that wanted to be involved in the School Pedagogy team. The team would be looking developing a St Joseph’s School localised Curriculum. I put my hand up to be involved as I was this as a way of continuing to build my teaching practice, have rich conversations with colleagues and have an impact to make change within our school. To date, the team has unpacked other schools curriculums, each team member streamlined two student agency approaches and broke these down further to make them relevant to our school and is now up to the draft of the localised curriculum.  We orgnaised a Staff Meeting in week 3 of Term 3 to share what we had done to date with staff and get feedback.

Motivation

Extrinsic- to Intrinsic

*Level 1 is not about being Extrinsic and then moving to intrinsic. Extrinsic can be at Level 1, looks different at each level

Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4
Learner is starting to discover the importance of their learning.  
Learner is beginning to be involved in the learning process.Learner is learning how to learn. Learner is developing a love of learning.

Learner is learning about what they are passionate about.

Learner is beginning to see learning as a way to participate within their community.

Learner understands the importance of their learning.

Learner is somewhat involved and in the learning process.

Learner is building a foundation of how they learn.

Learner has a love of learning, interested in new knowledge and skills

Learner wants to succeed and what makes them passionate.
Learner sees learning as a way to participate within their community.

Learner is starting to become invested their learning.

Learner is involved the learning process.

Learner has a foundation of how they learn and this drives them to want to learn more.
Learner has a love of learning, seeks new knowledge and skills.

Learner wants to succeed and knows what makes them passionate.
Learner sees learning as a way to positively participate within their community.

Learner is invested in their learning.

Learner is fully involved and immersed in the learning process.
Learner has a strong foundation of how they learn and this drives them to want to learn more.
Learner has a love of learning, independently seeks new knowledge and skills.
Learner has the desire to succeed and knows what makes them passionate.
Learner sees learning as a way to positively participate globally.

Ownership

Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4
Learners are developing their skills to work with others.

Learners are beginning to create strategies.

Learners are learning to set goals alongside the teacher.

Learners work alongside the teacher when setting and achieving their Personalised learning.

Learners create passion projects which are showcased to peers and family with support from the teacher.

Learners are developing their skills to independently work with others.

Learners are beginning to innovate and create strategies.

Learners understand the value of goal setting and will set them with some support.
Learners monitor and adjust their Personalised learning as they meet their goals with the support of the teacher.
Learners create passion projects in which are showcased to peers, family, and community.

Learners have the skills to work independently and effectively with others.

Learners use innovation and strategies independently.

Learners can set their own learning goals and these might include their interests and passions.
Learners self-monitor and adjust their Personalised learning as they meet their goals.

Learners create and evaluate passion projects which are showcased to peers, family and a wider audience.

Learners have the confidence and skills to work independently and effectively with others.
Learners use innovation, create and evaluate strategies independently.
Learners extend their goals to include their interests and passions.Learners are determined to self-monitor and adjust their personalised learning as they meet their goals.
Learners identify, create and evaluate passion projects which are showcased to peers, family and possibly a global audience.

*Two student agency drivers I looked at was motivation and ownership.

Week 3

Term 2 Reflection

Blog post links to PTC6- conceptualise, plan and implement an appropriate learning program

PTC7– promote a collaborative, inclusive and supportive learning environment

Half the year has come and gone and the past term has been just as crazy, actioned packed, demanding, overwhelming and rewarding as the term before. Term 2 was about taking another step towards the learners taking ownership of their learning and moving towards being more of an Advocate/Entrepreneur. In Term 2 we introducing Genius hour as a way of encouraging learner voice and a step towards implementing an element of project based learning. We used Physical Education to really focus on the Key Competencies and co-constructed what this looks like alongside the learners. There has been a change to our teaching team. Emma has taken leave and is exploring Europe for a year, Room 3 has a new teacher Nadia, she has joined the team and as a first-year teacher, she is finding her feet.

KC.png

Genius Hour Showcase

choice

Reflection of Term 2

Positive

  • Actioned packed term: Kapa Haka festival, Te Papa- Matariki, Poly Fest
  • 3-way conferences fully lead by the students
  • Student voice more visible through Genius hour, on the journey, adding in elements each term.
  • Students are able to manage their time and timetable

Minus

  • The timetable is very tight, at times feels like trying to cover more and then some.
  • Integration is occurring through Reading/Writing/Mathematics, these are still being taught in isolation, what is the next step towards PBL
  • The Arts, Science don’t seem to be getting coverage

Improvement 

  • Genius hour has a lot of potential, we will build on this next term, more specific focus, a purpose to work towards.
  • Continue to work on R.E and ensure this is being covered in our focus lesson as well as through the Integrated Unit
  • Working on aspects of PBL, small projects.

What we are keeping

  • Genius hour
  • Timetabling
  • Integrating of Inquiry and working alongside Ryan at Play.Sport to support us with enriching our Physical Education and Health

What are we changing 

  • Increasing Physical Education time, to increase the length in the lesson
  • Writing workshops (see Data.Anaylse.Action Blog for further details)

What are we adding in 

  • Priority learners for writing are going to get pre-writing workshop each day before the Writing workshop. This will replace four current Reading workshops in the second block from Monday-Thursday
  • Flipped learning through Writing and Maths

Join the table Pasifika leaders

Blog post links to PTC 4: demonstrate commitment to ongoing professional learning and development of personal professional practice

PTC5: show leadership that contributes to effective teaching and learning

This blog post is something I have been adding, deleting, changing, removing and altering since the beginning of the year (2016). I attended Actively Engaged as Pasifika Leaders through T.R.C.C in the July 2016 school holidays, nearly a year ago and I am still on the road of discovery…..what type of teacher am I, what type of leader am and what type of leader do I want to be.

In order to know where I am going, I need to know who I am, where I am from and who came before me.

Tena Koutou, Malo e Lelei, my name is Selina Peauafi. I lived in Orongomai (Upper Hutt) and the beautiful valley has been my home for the majority of my life. I am 31 years old, I have a son who is 10 years old who is Maori/Tongan/Kiwi and just as he does, I live in many different worlds and walk many different paths.

I am second generation Tonga, I am half Tongan and can only can understand being told off in Tongan. I have been to Tonga twice once. I currently understand and speak more Te Reo than Tongan. My Dad move to New Zealand when he was 21 years old, his first time on a plane was to his new home. My Mum was born and grow up in Upper Hutt where she works and lives with my Dad my our family home.

I have been teaching in the primary sector for the past seven years, four of those at St Joseph’s School, Upper Hutt and this will be my third year as a team leader.  St Joseph’s is a multicultural school with our learners ranging from year 1 to year 8. I teach year 5/6 learners in a collaborative environment alongside two teachers. I am the team leader of my area and lead teacher of Kaitiaki; a Maori/Pasifika parents group which was set up five years ago to be the voice within our school and to support in raising the achievement of our Maori and Pasifika learners.

Over the course of the past year since writing this blog post, I have reflected on my interactions and the part I play in the senior management team. When you step into a leadership role no one gives you a handbook and off you go. Based on your values, your prior experiences, knowledge and influential leaders that have come before you, you start to formulate some sort of leadership model. I grew up with a strong sense of respect towards my elders and still have those values embedded in how I interact with people in social and work situations.

I often find it hard to question what has been said by the principal and deputy because my automatic gut instinct is to comply out of respect. This does not mean I just sit back and accept everything that comes my way but I have to digest, process and then act. The first year being part of the senior management I sat in the weekly meetings, tried not to make eye contact and prayed no one would ask me a question. I attended the NZEI Fono 2016 and Caroline Mareko made a comment- You are either at the table or on the menu and this analogy hit home for me. I was at the table but didn’t have the confidence to be present at the table.

This past year since attending Actively Engaged as Pasifika Leaders through T.R.C.C   I have been working on developing my growth mindset while still upholding my cultural values. I went to see Sose Annandale principal of Russel Primary at the NZEI Pasifika 2016 fono as I was interested to hear her speak about her journey as a Pasifika Leader. I was amazed at some the statistics that were shared in regards to Pasifika/Maori Teachers, Management, and Principals based on New Zealand Integrated Teacher Head Count data collected for April 2015.

 

Pasifika Teachers: 1,351

Palangi Teachers: 39,247

Pasifika Management: 53 ( 14=M, 39=F)

Palagi Management: 2,061 (561=M, 1,500=F)

Pasifika Principals: 31 (16=M, 15=F)

Palangi Principals: 1,869 (987=M, 882=F)

I was totally blown away by the lack of representation of Pasifika teachers in Managment and Principals roles, especially Pasifika women. The challenge has been set to ensure our Pasifika teachers get themselves at the table. I aspire to lead by ensuring that my voice is heard when I sit at the table.

leadership

leadership-1

leadership2

Pictures from T.R.C.C- Actively Engaged as Pasifika Leaders

 

Google Summit Day 2

Blog post links to PTC4: demonstrate commitment to ongoing professional learning and development of personal professional practice

PTC5: show leadership that contributes to effective teaching and learning

Keynote: Let Learning “TRUMP” teaching and technology 

Presenter: Richard Wells

A blurb about the keynote: Making future-ready learning environments challenges the habits and assumptions held by students, teachers and the community. Shifting to a personalised, student-centred approach from kindergarten to high school has proven difficult for many at all levels. In this talk, Richard offers numerous common sense arguments and examples where a strong focus on learning to learn solves all issues with covering topics, skills, and competencies. He will cover the key factors that often get forgotten when schools attempt to change.

My notes:

– Key competencies need to be taught in order for learners to be success citizens

– How reliant are my students on their teacher?

– Teacher lead teaching described as being like a lotto, putting pressure on the teacher.

– What next? How am I doing? What is my message? Will I succeed? Should I connect?

– Design Thinking

– Set the expectation high

Where to next:

-Direct acts of teaching with specific Key Competencies, integrating this through our inquiry. Bringing Key Competencies to the forefront and having a focus each lesson.

 

Workshop 5: Using mystery hangouts to promote critical thinking and global connections 

Presenter: Michael Davidson

A blurb about the keynote: Want to connect to other classrooms around the globe? Not sure what to talk about with them? Come and find out about Mystery Hangouts. Michael will go through some basics of setting up the jobs for learners and how to contact other schools and teachers to set up your Mystery Hangout. We will also have a practice of going through one with each other to show you how one might proceed. So come along and start (or continue) your journey of becoming a globally connected classroom!

 

Bio: Michael is a Level 2 Google Certified Teacher. A Canadian national, he has been teaching in New Zealand schools for the past five years. Prior to teaching in New Zealand, he was a teacher in London, UK and Seoul, Korea. He is constantly looking for ways to improve his teaching and make it more student-centered. Michael is currently based in a Habitat of 80+ year 3/4 learners at Ormiston Primary School in Auckland where he is assisting other learning coaches in implementing digital and collaborative solutions that fit their needs.

Notes: 

Google Slide Presentation

Where to next:

-Organise to have a Mystery Hangout with someone local. Link through writing, what questions can we ask, what questions might they ask us?

Workshop 6: Assessment with Forms, Docs and add-ons 

Presenter: Matt Wells

Bio: Matt currently works as the Leader of Learning and Innovation at All Saints Catholic College, Liverpool located in Sydney’s South West. The College has been recognised over the years as being innovative in the area of using ICTs. Matt has coordinated the transition of the College from a lab-based, PC environment to a 1:1 MacBook school that has been actively using the Google Apps For Education tools for many years. As part of the transition process, Matt has spent a lot of time working with his staff, exploring ways to effectively integrate the use of technologies in the classroom. Matt was recognised as an Apple Distinguished Educator in 2009, a Google Certified Innovator in 2011 and a Google for Education Trainer in 2015.

A blurb about the workshop: Google forms are a great tool for gathering responses from students for both formative and summative assessments. BUT marking these and providing feedback to students can be difficult. This session will focus on workflows that can make this process far easier. Covers Socrative, Kahoot, Flubaroo, AutoCrat

Notes:

Google slide presentation 

Workshop 7: Choose your own Adventure

Presenters: Philippa Nicoll Antipas

Bio: Philippa Nicoll Antipas is an experienced facilitator with the Connected Learning Advisory, where she supports clusters, leaders and teachers to embed digital technologies for learning. As a passionate educator, Philippa has a particular focus on learner-centred curriculum, design thinking, and engaging professional learning and development.

A blurb about the workshop: In this hands-on session, we will explore how learners can create choose your own adventure / pick-a-path books in Google Slides for an online, interactive reading experience. We will also consider how to connect with others in our community, and how to embed aspects of digital citizenship into this learning experience.

Notes:

Workshop 8: Experience a Student-led Classroom- today

Presenter: Richard Wells 

A blurb about the workshop: In this session, participants will join as students and lead a learning activity themselves. Richard provides example tools and behaviours for developing a student-led learning space. It’s fun, thought-provoking and full of resources to take back to your classroom and use with any year group 0 – 13.

Notes:

Original and revised activity.

Where to next:

-Embedding the Key competencies through our workshops